Analysis of the road not taken

What we have in a nutshell, is a masterpiece, an alluring feature of which, is its inherent ambiguity. But you yourself can resurrect it from zombie-hood by reading it—not with imagination, even, but simply with accuracy. People take it very seriously.

The road not taken question and answers

Thus, one should make their decision swiftly and with confidence. It is about what the poem never mentions: the choice the speaker did not make, which still haunts him. If life is a journey, this poem highlights those times in life when a decision has to be made. On reflection, however, taking the road "because it was grassy and wanted wear" has made all the difference, all the difference in the world. This sets the mood of indecision that characterizes the language of the poem. The Kite Runner Chapters Summary, Literary Devices, Analysis Critics of this poem are likely always to argue whether it is an affirmation of the crucial nature of the choices people must make on the road of life or a gentle satire on the sort of temperament that always insists on struggling with such choices. The use of literary devices is intended to bring richness and clarity to the text with different meanings.

What is clear is that the speaker is, at least, a person like Thomas in some respects though there may well be some of Frost in him also.

In fact, the subject matter of the poem is a recreation of a persistent habit of Edward Thomas, who frequently talked about taking an alternative trail. On reflection, however, taking the road "because it was grassy and wanted wear" has made all the difference, all the difference in the world.

Allusion in the road not taken

Though there is some regret over his choice, yet he realizes that the things he has encountered and the places he has visited, because of this path, have made all the difference in his life. The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost is also filled with important undertones with the following literary devices. The central message is that, in life, we are often presented with choices. Oh, I kept the first for another day! In other words, Frost's friend regretted not taking the road that might have offered the best opportunities, despite it being an unknown. The situation demands a serious approach, for who knows what the outcome will be? External factors therefore make up his mind for him. All of Robert Frost's poems can be found in this exceptional book, The Collected Poems , which I use for all my analyses. Viewing a choice as a fork in a path, it becomes clear that we must choose one direction or another, but not both. It is about what the poem never mentions: the choice the speaker did not make, which still haunts him. Indeed, shortly after receiving this poem in a letter, Edward Thomas's Army regiment was sent to Arras, France, where he was killed two months later. The fairytale-like language also accentuates the way the poem slowly launches into a conjuring trick.

The speaker implies that, when he's older he might look back at this turning point in his life, the morning he took the road less travelled, because taking that particular route completely altered his way of being. Paths in the woods and forks in roads are ancient and deep-seated metaphors for the lifeline, its crises and decisions.

There are four beats per line, employing iambic tetrameter. At the moment of decision-making, both roads present themselves equally, thus the choice of which to go down is, essentially, a toss up—a game of chance.

Here, each stanza is a quintain such as the first one or the second one.

The road not taken theme

Perhaps forever. The metaphor is activated. It's the most comprehensive collection currently on offer. Had Frost had a particular and irrevocable choice of his own? In other words, Frost's friend regretted not taking the road that might have offered the best opportunities, despite it being an unknown. Its triumph is that it does travel two emotional trajectories while cohering as a single statement. The first road is described as bending into the undergrowth. At this point in the poem, Frost tries to encourage readers to overcome the fear of the unknown: someone must be the first person to try a new thing. The descriptions of each road one bends under the undergrowth, and the other is "just as fair" indicates to the reader that, when making a life-altering decision, it is impossible to see where that decision will lead. Some may prove beneficial and some may not, but one cannot have two ways of life. What we have in a nutshell, is a masterpiece, an alluring feature of which, is its inherent ambiguity. Instead, he believed it was a serious reflection on the need for decisive action. All the speaker knows is that he prefers the road less travelled, perhaps because he enjoys solitude and believes that to be important. The self has been split.

Clearly, this is to emphasize that both roads appeared untouched, not having been tarnished by the foot of a previous traveler. The repetition of I—as well as heightening the rhetorical drama—mirrors this idea of division.

metaphors in the road not taken
Rated 8/10 based on 31 review
Download
The Road Not Taken Critical Analysis